Individuals can become vulnerable for a variety of reasons. Perhaps a child is in need of parental care because his or her parents have passed away. Or, maybe your elderly loved one no longer has the ability to make important life decisions on his or her own, and is considered to be incapacitated. Whatever the reason may be for the need to help a loved one, you have options available to you that can truly help to protect your loved one’s rights and interests. When determining what steps you need to take, you should consider how both guardianship and conservatorship may best suit your particular situation. In order to find out whether or not guardianship and conservatorship might be right for you and your loved ones, it is necessary to speak with a Tucson Guardianship and Conservatorship Attorney.

How Williams & Williams, PLLC Can Help You – Understanding Guardianship and Conservatorship

With the assistance of an attorney, you will have a thorough understanding of how guardianship and conservatorship can help someone in need. The information below provides a general overview of how both of these processes work. In addition to reviewing this information, you should seek the advice of a Tucson Guardianship and Conservatorship Attorney.

What is Guardianship?

If an individual is in need of care, such as a minor or incapacitated adult, a person or entity may be appointed by the court to be a guardian of that individual. Once a guardian is appointed, the minor or incapacitated individual is considered a ward. When determining who the guardian should be, the court considers a variety of factors. If the ward is a minor, the court will take into account the minor’s best interests when appointing a guardian. If the minor is age fourteen (14) or older, he or she has the ability to choose his or her guardian.

If the ward is an incapacitated adult, the court will appoint an individual who is competent to act as guardian and who can carry out the best interests of the incapacitated person, such as making personal decisions regarding medical care, for example. When choosing a guardian, the court will look at a list of priorities of appointment (i.e., a blood relative may have greater priority than a friend of the incapacitated individual), and choose a guardian that is best suited for the minor or incapacitated adult.

What is Conservatorship?

Conservatorship is similar to guardianship in that the process is intended to protect an individual’s rights and interests, including a minor or incapacitated individual’s financial affairs and property. A conservator is appointed by the court to manage a minor or incapacitated individual’s property and finances. The minor or incapacitated individual is deemed a “protected person.” Any competent person can serve as a conservator, and upon filing a petition with the court, a judge will ensure that the person or entity appointed as conservator will carry out the best interests of the minor or incapacitated adult.

Contact the Tucson Guardianship and Conservatorship Attorneys of Williams & Williams, PLLC Today

When a loved one is in need of care and/or is no longer able to make important decisions on his or her own, it may be time to consider guardianship and conservatorship to ensure your loved one’s well-being is protected. Before making the decision to pursue guardianship and conservatorship, your entire situation should be evaluated by a skilled Tucson Guardianship and Conservatorship Attorney. It may turn out that you have other options available to you that will work better for your particular situation. At Williams & Williams, PLLC, our Tucson Guardianship and Conservatorship Attorneys utilize all available resources to ensure their clients are making informed decisions when considering guardianship, conservatorship, or other estate planning tools. Our attorneys provide an array of legal services that are catered to each and every client’s unique situation. If you would like to speak directly with one of our Tucson Guardianship and Conservatorship Attorneys, contact Williams & Williams, PLLC today by calling (520) 200-8501. We are available 24/7 to answer your questions and address your concerns.